BeetleMortality

0th

Percentile

Bliss (1935) Beetle Mortality Data

Mortality of adult flour beetle after five hours' exposure to gaseous carbon disulphide.

Keywords
datasets
Usage
data("BeetleMortality")
Details

The data originates from Bliss (1935) and has been reanalyzed frequently.

Format

A data frame containing 8 observations on 3 variables.

dose
numeric. $\log_{10}$ dose.
died
integer. Number killed.
n
integer. Number exposed.

Source

Bliss CI (1935). “The Calculation of the Dosage-Mortality Curve.” Annals of Applied Biology, 22, 134--167.

References

Aranda-Ordaz F (1981). “On Two Families of Transformations to Additivity for Binary Response Data.” Biometrika, 68, 357--363.

Hauck W (1990). “Choice of Scale and Asymmetric Logistic Models.” Biometrical Journal, 32, 79--86

Prentice RL (1976). “A Generalization of the Probit and Logit Methods for Dose Response Curves.” Biometrics, 38, 761--768.

Pregibon D (1980). “Goodness of Link Tests for Generalized Linear Models.” Journal of the Royal Statistical Society C, 29, 15--23.

Aliases
  • BeetleMortality
Examples
## data
data("BeetleMortality", package = "glmx")

## various standard binary response models
m <- lapply(c("logit", "probit", "cloglog"), function(type)
  glm(cbind(died, n - died) ~ dose, data = BeetleMortality, family = binomial(link = type)))

## visualization
plot(I(died/n) ~ dose, data = BeetleMortality)
lines(fitted(m[[1]]) ~ dose, data = BeetleMortality, col = 2)
lines(fitted(m[[2]]) ~ dose, data = BeetleMortality, col = 3)
lines(fitted(m[[3]]) ~ dose, data = BeetleMortality, col = 4)
Documentation reproduced from package glmx, version 0.1-1, License: GPL-2 | GPL-3

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