zip

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Compress Files into 'zip' Archives

zipr and zip both create a new zip archive file.

Usage
zip(zipfile, files, recurse = TRUE, compression_level = 9,
  include_directories = TRUE)

zipr(zipfile, files, recurse = TRUE, compression_level = 9, include_directories = TRUE)

zip_append(zipfile, files, recurse = TRUE, compression_level = 9, include_directories = TRUE)

zipr_append(zipfile, files, recurse = TRUE, compression_level = 9, include_directories = TRUE)

Arguments
zipfile

The zip file to create. If the file exists, zip overwrites it, but zip_append appends to it.

files

List of file to add to the archive. See details below about absolute and relative path names.

recurse

Whether to add the contents of directories recursively.

compression_level

A number between 1 and 9. 9 compresses best, but it also takes the longest.

include_directories

Whether to explicitly include directories in the archive. Including directories might confuse MS Office when reading docx files, so set this to FALSE for creating them.

Details

zipr_append and zip_append append compressed files to an existing 'zip' file.

Value

The name of the created zip file, invisibly.

Permissions

zipr() (and zip(), zipr_append(), etc.) add the permissions of the archived files and directories to the ZIP archive, on Unix systems. Most zip and unzip implementations support these, so they will be recovered after extracting the archive.

Note, however that the owner and group (uid and gid) are currently omitted, even on Unix.

Relative paths

The different between zipr and zip is how they handle the relative paths of the input files.

For zip (and zip_append), the root of the archive is supposed to be the current working directory. The paths of the files are fully kept in the archive. Absolute paths are also kept. Note that this might result non-portable archives: some zip tools do not handle zip archives that contain absolute file names, or file names that start with ..// or ./. This behavior is kept for compatibility, and we suggest that you use zipr and zipr_append for new code.

E.g. for the following directory structure:

foo
  bar
    file1
  bar2
    file2
foo2
  file3

Assuming the current working directory is foo, the following zip entries are created by zip:

zip("x.zip", c("bar/file1", "bar2", "../foo2"))
zip_list("x.zip")$filename
#> bar/file1
#> bar2
#> bar2/file2
#> ../foo2
#> ../foo2/file3

For zipr (and zipr_append), each specified file or directory in files is created as a top-level entry in the zip archive. We suggest that you use zipr and zipr_append for new code, as they don't create non-portable archives. For the same directory structure, these zip entries are created:

zipr("x.zip", c("bar/file1", "bar2", "../foo2"))
zip_list("x.zip")$filename
#> file1
#> bar2
#> bar2/file2
#> foo2
#> foo2/file3

Because of the potential issues with zip() and zip_append(), they are now soft-deprecated, and their first use in the R session will trigger a reminder message. To suppress this message, you can use something like this:

withCallingHandlers(
  zip::zip(...),
  deprecated = function(e) NULL)

Aliases
  • zip
  • zipr
  • zip_append
  • zipr_append
Examples
# NOT RUN {
## Some files to zip up
dir.create(tmp <- tempfile())
cat("first file", file = file.path(tmp, "file1"))
cat("second file", file = file.path(tmp, "file2"))

zipfile <- tempfile(fileext = ".zip")
zipr(zipfile, tmp)

## List contents
zip_list(zipfile)

## Add another file
cat("third file", file = file.path(tmp, "file3"))
zipr_append(zipfile, file.path(tmp, "file3"))
zip_list(zipfile)
# }
Documentation reproduced from package zip, version 2.0.4, License: CC0

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